Events

We occasionally attend events to help spread the word about Reading’s cultural and heritage spaces, usually taking our gazebo and/or info tricycle, together with some activity or competition.

2019  events:

Nancy Astor talk/exhibition – Whitenights campus – organised by The Friends of the University of Reading (we provided an Edith Morley suffrage exhibit and equipment)

Big Band Big Lunch – London Road campus – with The Friends of the University of Reading and Ure Museum (we provided an iMuse activity)

Water Fest – Reading Abbey ruins – with Reading Cycle Campaign (we just provided the tricycle in Abbey Gateway livery)

East Reading Festival – Palmer Park – with The Friends of the University of Reading and Junction Arch Heritage & Arts CIC (we provided the whole stand, an exhibition and competition of historic photos of the Junction)

3 Bees Family Fun Day – Reading Old Cemetery – run by Nature Nurture/Econet (we provided a mini ‘cinema’ showing various insects)

In Reading Gaol by Reading Town – the Turbine House – a group of artists (we will provide the info tricycle for publicity)

Heritage Open Days – Cemetery Junction – with Junction Arch Heritage & Arts

BAfM Conference – Town Hall – Friends of Reading Museum

 

Vote 100 Reading

RG Spaces is running a couple of events to celebrate 100 years of (some) women being allowed to vote in UK Parliamentary elections and 90 years of universal suffrage (when most people over 21 got the vote)

On June 22 and 23 2018 we are running Equaliteas in the Central Library Reading – free tea and cake 2.30 to 4.30pm

Click to go to our Equalitea quiz

On the weekends of 8 and 9 and 15 and 16 September 2018 we are opening the Acacias, London Rd during the national Heritage Open Days 12noon to 6pm

Risk Assessments

Twitter


sats test

Tricycle stops

Test gps


With the help of Mark from @MarkStanleyUK and Mike the Bee of RLab, Reading’s Hackspace, we are experimenting with a GPS sensor to put our @Reading2016 Information Tricycle on
The Things Network in Reading

You can see where the GPS sensor has been (and when, relative to today) and The Things Network gateways that were used, and you can get a sense of the relative SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) and RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indication)

Select what you’d like mapped

Move around the map to see tricycles in different colours indicating the different gateways.
Min SNR: Max SNR: Min RSSI: Max RSSI: (the closer to 0 the better for RSSI – is the right thing being shown here?)

[testtricyclegpsmap]


Tricycle GPS map


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Click here to see the places the tricycle has acted as an Information Point.

With the help of Mark from @MarkStanleyUK and Mike the Bee of RLab, Reading's Hackspace, we are experimenting with a GPS sensor to put our @Reading2016 Information Tricycle on The Things Network in Reading.

Initially, the box was carried by hand or stationed on the tricycle's sidekick (a Brompton foldup bicycle). Now (from late March 2016)it's mounted on the tricycle for real.

You can see where the GPS sensor has been (and when, relative to today) and The Things Network gateways that were used, and you can get a sense of the relative SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) and RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indication) by the opacity of a tricycle, depending on which map you choose to display.

Select what you'd like mapped
Move around the map to see different colours indicating the different gateways.

ALL: on this map all data points are mapped - fainter=longer ago; the number=number of TTN gateways reached

space for map

Minsats: 5 Total points: 0 Min SNR: 99999 Max SNR: -99999 Min RSSI: 99999 Max RSSI: -99999

Twitter


Highest ever Splat Medusa score

Our tent at the Festival was buzzing with visitors – and one scored a straight 100 on Splat Medusa, a record. We also had dozens of Ure Museum mugs painted, lots of interest in the East Reading Connections stand, the London Road Heritage Trail, Ladybird Book and Artist in the Harris Garden mini-apps. Thanks to the Festival organisers for a good day. You can play splat.imuse.org.uk from the comfort of your own iPad (or even PC) if you’d like some practice.

iMuse & iOpener move to RG spaces

The iMuse and iOpener programmes run by the charity Access-Ability Communications Technology (AACT) are moving to RG spaces in Summer 2015. iMuse works with museums and galleries locally to seek lowcost ways of using mobile phones and tablets to make visits more fun and accessible for everyone. iOpener is experimenting with making online trails and encouraging people to make their own around Reading.

Policies, risk assessments & other documentation

  

iMuse

RG spaces will take over the management of the iMuse programme from the charity AACT from Summer 2015. Here is a list of the projects so far.

  • Olympic trail We are working on a 5-stop (one for each day of the Ancient Olympics) trail in the Ure Museum of Classical Archaeology. Each stop will have one object associated with a particular day. Material has been gathered from the Open University’s excellent Openlearn Olympics information. Some of the same problems as in the Berkshire Farmer trail have ...
  • Berkshire farmer trail Labels with QR codes and Widgit symbols are now tied to various objects in the Museum of English Rural Life with (soft) tape supplied by the Museum Conservator. We’ve started to let visitors try it for themselves on our iPad-on-a-trolley. Video, especially of the thresher, was popular yesterday, as was breaking out to draw corn and ...
  • Tweet a sheep Mondrian-on-iPad inspiring bunting design for MERL Fete, 9 June, Reading More sheep tweeted from the Young Farmers’ Club Berkshire Country Show, Englefield Estate, Nr Reading, 27 May 2012. And our intrepid iPad-wearing camera team took these photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/aacttest/sets/72157629929127464/ Visitors to MERL’s stand at Lambing Sunday, Amner’s Farm, near Reading, Berkshire, UK, 29 April 2012 made their own sheep ...
  • More experiences with touch screens and QR codes We’ve found that some people can have difficulty making touchscreens work. There can also be problems with lining-up the camera  on a smartphone or iPad with a QRcode. A previous blog, http://imusenews.blogspot.co.uk/2012/02/initial-experiences-with-touch-screens.html, described these problems. We have a bit more experience, from both visitors and volunteers/staff at our iMuse partner museum and from more elderly and partially-sighted ...
  • The Great Fire Engine Mystery – the story It’s Good Friday – the one day in the year that the workers in the village have as holiday. But, Chief Engineer Rab Bit and his team have to test the fire engine. Disaster strikes as Rab is walking to the village through the woods. He steps on a rabbit trap. He drops his notebook. He manages ...
  • Getting to grips with the heritage trail  iMuse in Reading is creating a small exhibition to accompany The Friends’ London Road Campus Heritage Trail (Sunday 25 March 2012 – all welcome). After a morning going through the photos we already have from The Friends’ and Women’s Club previous mini exhibitions plus those in the UMASCS (University Museum and Archives and Special Collections ...
  • What are we all here for anyway? – Part 2 What’s imuse trying to achieve? Part 1 is at http://www.aact.org.uk/imuse.php. Here’s some more thoughts. We picked up interesting ideas from Museum Computer Network conference, Atlanta, November 2011 especially from Nettrice’s workshop on Alternate Reality Games – ways of encouraging visitors and museum interaction. Some of those methods were used in the mini ARG ...
  • The Great Reading Cheese Mystery – Part 5 more observations from half-term Lorna noted these comments made during the Great Reading Cheese Mystery trial at the Museum of English Rural Life. “best trail I’ve ever done at a museum” “it was really fun and I liked it a lot” (6 year old) “it was fun but someone was sitting on the basket at clue 6” “it was fun but ...
  • The Great Reading Cheese Mystery additional notes As one of the project aims is to encourage people to learn more about their heritage, the project worked on creating a mini Alternate Reality Game aimed at children aged 6- 13 visiting the MERL during the February half-term. A topic was selected that incorporated the fact that the building next door to the MERL was ...
  • A trail based on ‘Not Just a Berkshire Farmer’ – Part 1 – initial ideas A local farmer, Bert Houghton, wrote some charming books in the ’80s and ’90s about his experiences. We were introduced to them by his step-daughter, who is the head of a special school nearby. We’ve now found copies of ‘Not just a Berkshire Farmer’ and ‘Just more of the Berkshire Farmer’ in the Museum of English ...
  • Ure museum Olympics trail – Part 1 Preliminary thoughts Amy in the Ure Museum, University of Reading, UK, has given us some terrific material for an Olympics trail. This would be in addition to their exciting work they are already doing with the Open University producing an iPhone app, and also two local schools looking at the objects in imaginative and fun ways. We think ...
  • The Great Reading Cheese Mystery Part 4 -making the QR code reader We needed a cast-iron way that visitors taking part in the game could get the ‘clues’ decoded. Having experienced problems with wi-fi coverage in some parts of the museum, and also found some visitors had problems with the iPad touch screen, we used an iPad box and security device to make a (very) simple prototype ...
  • The Great Reading Cheese Mystery – Part 3 Half-term visitors taking part This note gives the numbers taking part in the imuse-organised activities in the Museum of English Rural Life, Reading, UK, half-term week February 2012  . Number of children: 134 Quite a few more than: 85 adults Total number of people more than: 219 The Great Cheese Mystery Trail is described in other posts.Daily breakdown: Tuesday: ...
  • The Great Reading Cheese Mystery Part 2 – Report from the weekend Notes from Rob Davies, a member of Museum of English Rural Life staff who helped out Friday-Sunday Initial responses Families were very keen from the beginning, the use of an ipad is considered an exciting and surprising activity in a museum. A parent said “the last thing they expected to see or use here was an ipad ...
  • Initial experiences with touch screens & QR codes We’ve tried a very simple ‘game’ in which an object had an A4-sized label attached looking like this. The child is asked to find one of the labels in the museum, a volunteer scans the QR code with an iPad 2 and the child is asked to ‘touch’ whichever object they think they are looking ...
  • The Great Reading Cheese Mystery Part 1 – Creating our first mini Alternate Reality game The ‘iMuse in Reading’ sub-project aims to encourage people to learn more about their heritage and that of others in novel ways. We are creating a mini ‘Alternate Reality Game’ (ARG) aimed at families with children aged 6-13 visiting the Museum of English Rural Life during half-term, February 2012. The techniques we used were informed by a workshop ...
  • The Great Reading Cheese Mystery – the story Pongo Cheddar is professor of Food Technology at Reading University.He is short of money because he made an unwise investment in Cheesey Wotsits just before the world economy took a massive dive in 2008. For some time his colleagues have noticed his suspicious behaviour. He has been spotted observing the dairy herd at odd hours. ...
  • Creating an audio stop on the Ure Museum Olympic Trail
  • RSA Fellowship Catalyst Grant The RSA has given a grant of £1,500 from its Catalyst Fund to Fellow Annette Haworth.Annette is imuse’s voluntary Project Manager.She will put £900 of  her grant towards the cost of engaging a museum learning professional who will help create material especially for people with communication and learning disabilities.£500 of the grant will be used ...
  • Welcome to imuse imuse is a programme trying-out some low-cost ways that visitors can communicate with a museum and with each other using mobile phones and tablets like iPads. imuse is partnering with some medium-sized museums to see if the ideas work in practice.If they do we aim to help set up an advisory service so smaller museums can ...
  • The iMuse Programme boy and young person communicating using an iPad in a museumThe Programme works with small/modest sized museums and their visitors to try out educational, engaging and fun ways of increasing accessibility and communication. Its projects are listed individually.
  • Communicating via video communicating using videoTraining in 2 special schools on using video to encourage communication.
  • iSay This pilot experimented with various IT systems and symbols. It then moved on to form the iMuse Programme.
  • Summer 2010 Project Background research on communications disabilities and on fundraising, presentations on AACT and selective mutism to both a school and to a group of Chinese teachers during their Summer vacation course.
  • Virtual Learning Academy This project trained 45 schoolchildren who had communications difficulties through hearing impairment. in the use of ICT.